WSJ’s John Fund Visits St. Paul, Gives Voter Fraud Talk

by Jeremy Griffith

John Fund, author, Fox News and WSJ contributor. – photo by Jeremy Griffith

Wall Street Journal and Fox News contributor John Fund was in St. Paul, Minnesota Monday to promote his new book and to talk to fans about the issue of requiring voter ID at the polls in order to prevent voter fraud.

Fund’s book, entitled “Who’s Counting? How Fraudsters and Bureaucrats Put Your Vote At Risk”, prominently features issues of alleged voter fraud in Minnesota during the 2008 election campaign in its opening chapter.

“I at least wanted to come here to thank the folks who read my work, who watch my various appearances on the networks, to at least thank you for your support,” said Fund.”You pay my salary!”

“I know there are a lot of people who will hear a lot of different things about the Voter ID amendment. Our goal is this,” said Fund. “It’s what Democratic Senator Chris Dodd said when we passed the bipartisan ‘Help America Vote’ act, which by the way says contrary to the opponents of this amendment a military ID is a valid government ID, no military personnel will be denied the right to vote.”

“What (Dodd) said is, ‘this is America! We can make it easy to vote and hard to cheat!” said Fund, quoting Dodd. “We can do both at the same time!”

“This is America! We can make it easy to vote and hard to cheat! We can do both at the same time!” -John Fund, Wall Street Journal

Fund’s appearance was facilitated by Minnesota Majority and ProtectMyVote.com and took place at O’Gara’s Bar and Grill in St. Paul. Both organizations have been active in drafting legislation in Minnesota and raising awareness of voter disenfranchisement due to voter fraud. A full video of Fund’s remarks is available here.

Minnesota Majority Chairman Dan McGrath, introduced the key note speaker. McGrath helped write legislation requiring voter identification at the polls. A ballot question setting forth a constitutional amendment to require voter ID at the polls will be voted on by the electorate in November’s general election.

Dan McGrath, Minnesota Majority. – photo by Jeremy Griffith

“My grandmother is 92-years old, she has photo ID,” McGrath said, explaining his rational for support of ballot question. “She needs it to see her doctor and pick up her prescriptions. The idea (of the opposition) that senior citizens won’t be able to vote is nonsense.”

“‘It’s going to eliminate same day registration’, they say,” said McGrath said, quoting opposition to the amendment. “Absolute nonsense. Nothing in the amendment calls for that, nothing in statue implies that is going to happen. It’s a desperate lie and nothing more!”

Since the 2008 election, McGrath has almost single-handedly bird-dogged the Voter ID fraud issue, resulting in the placement of the ballot initiative on the ballot and the conviction of over 200 cases of voter fraud.

McGrath and Minnesota Majority won a major victory early this month when the Supreme Court decided that the Secretary of State Mark Ritchie does not have the authority to change the title of ballot questions as they appear on the ballot when the legislature has already decided on a name. Ritchie, along with Attorney General Lori Swanson, who both oppose the Voter ID amendment, approved the name change of two ballot initiatives, the Voter ID amendment question and the Traditional Marriage Amendment. The Supreme Court’s decision chastises state officials for changing the title of the amendments and restores the original titles as they will appear on the amendment.

According to McGrath, a lot of work is needed to raise awareness about the Voter ID Amendment ballot question to inform voters and dispel myths from the opposition.

“We need to spend some money getting this message out there, refuting those lies, using logic and reason to explain how the amendment works and what it doesn’t do,” said McGrath.

“We need to spend some money getting this message out there, refuting those lies, using logic and reason to explain how the amendment works and what it doesn’t do,” -Dan McGrath, Minnesota Majority.

Legislation to require voter ID at the polls was vetoed earlier by Governor Mark Dayton. A constitutional amendment has the power to overcome a governor’s veto. Constitutional amendments like the Voter ID and Marriage Amendments require a majority of voters to pass, and a abstention from voting equals a no vote according to Minnesota Statues.

The League of Women Voters is one of nearly 80 organizations who oppose the Voter ID ballot question, saying it will disenfranchise the poor, the elderly and military voters serving overseas.

ProtectMyVote.com staff hand out campaign signs at an event in St. Paul. John Fund of WSJ spoke in favor of a voter ID amendment in Minnesota. – photo by Jeremy Griffith

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