Hagedorn Challenges Walz on Importation of Prisoners of War

by Jeremy Griffith
The American Millennium

In a press conference recently near the Federal Medical Center prison in Rochester Minnesota, congressional candidate Jim Hagedorn challenged his opponent, incumbent Tim Walz on his policy to accept the importation of prisoners of war from Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba to the facility in Rochester.

Hagedorn, the Republican challenger in the local District 1 race called Walz’s support of President Obama’s policy to close GITMO and import terrorists into prisons in the continental United States as reckless, unnecessarily endangering citizens of the country.

The first duty of an public official, Hagedorn said, is to protect the citizens of his state and nation, something Walz doesn’t seem to understand, Hagedorn said.

See the video of the press conference here.

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Millennium Endorsements for Midterm 2014 Election

By Jeremy Griffith
Publisher of the American Millennium Online

Jeremy Griffith here with American Millennium Online. I want to get on record and talk to you about who we support for Minnesota elections for election day Nov. 4. That would be the royal we being me because I’m the only one here. Ahem.

 

For Governor we endorse Jeff Johnson and his running mate Bill Kuisle for governor over incumbent democrat Mark Dayton. There’s a really good ad out there for Johnson which I think explains it all, namely that Dayton is too dazed and confused to be a good governor. We need someone in there who actually has Minnesota values that won’t just reward cronies with government funds. Johnson has experience in politics in the state and he has the a common sense conservative vision. Bill has been a representative in the state, I think they’ll make a really good team. Dayton just needs to retire. He’s a joke and he needs to go away.

 

For Senate I endorse Mike McFadden. He’s a businessman who knows how to create jobs and run a business. His opponent Al Franken is a former SNL comedian who is well past his prime and has ceased to be funny a long time ago. Now he’s just sad. He got to office under questionable circumstances six years ago and is the 60th vote on the dreaded Affordable Health care act or Obamacare which is neither affordable nor is it care. It’s killing small businesses, resulting in lay offs and increased premiums and not covering everyone it said it would cover. Obamacare is a joke and Al Franken is the punchline, only neither one of them is funny. So vote for McFadden and get Al out of there.

 

I’ve done some campaigning with my personal favorite Jim Hagedorn. Jim’s dad was a representative and he’s got politics in his blood. I think he’ll be a good representative to replace Tim Walz. Walz the former educator and Sergeant Major of the Army National Guard has served his country long enough. It’s not his service prior to being elected that concerns us, it’s what he’s done with his time in the house of representatives since, voting in lockstep with Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid. Not at all in keeping with the values of southern Minnesota. He talks a good game, talks about veterans, farmers, blah blah blah, but his record speaks louder. He wants to convince you that he is for you and your interests, but he votes in the opposite direction. The VA has been failing veterans for many years and Walz has done nothing to turn that around and as been largely silent on the issue. During the government shut down he said nothing about the shutdown of the World War II memorial as elderly veterans waited outside barracades that had no business being there. Republicans showed up and threw down the barricades and let the veterans in, and Tim Walz, a 22-year veteran himself was no where to be seen and said absolutely nothing.

 

Walz had the chance to vote to extend pay and benefits to full time reserve and national guard during the government shutdown. Those individuals were required to go to work regardless of pay. Essentially working for free. The representative had a chance to vote on a bill to pay those folks retroactively and he voted no, so so much for the guy who supports the veterans. Also he voted on a bill to cut the budget which contained a clause to cut benefits of retired veterans including the disabled by 1 percent per year, which would hurt retirees, especially those dealing with disabilities. Now everyone agrees that budget cuts are needed to get to fiscal sanity. Even the military needs to be cut, but not pay and benefits of those who risk their lives on our behalf and not for those who were wounded in action because of their bravery. Once again the veteran soldier does us no favors in this regard. He’s failed us again on this issue.

 

The government is paying for massages for bunnies, and diesel fuel for a powerplant in Afghanistan that has never been turned on, when they get their power from Iran, they’re doing research on why lesbians are fat and putting lobsters on treadmills, but they can’t pay our veterans what they are owed. Time to go Tim, we’ve had just about enough of you.

 

Jim Hagedorn is for common sense conservative solutions, smaller more accountable government and fiscal responsibility and has a record as a government employee that cut the fat out of his own department. Who do you know had done that. He talks the talk and walks the walk and he’s a fighter. He’ll scrap with members of his own party as well as the democrats to serve his constituents at home and that’s why we like him.

 

At the local level I’m voting for Breanna Bly who is running again for state senate again against Tina Liebling. You know Liebling is one of those who talks a good game to local constituents, but when it comes to the votes she has made, she’s just another big government bleeding heart liberal. Breanna is a sweet-heart who believes in fiscal responsibility. She listens to her constituents and I think she’ll be a great improvement over Liebling in the state legislature.

 

And those are my picks. I think they’re great. Go out and vote Nov 4. That’s election day. If you can’t vote on that day, Minnesota has early in-person absentee voting, just go down to the fairgrounds if you live in Olmsted County, the poll there is open there until the day of the election, you can register right away if you aren’t already registered and you can vote the same day. It’s very convenient.

 

That’s the way I voted and that’s the way my girlfriend voted. She got her citizenship here in the US last month and she voted in her first election ever here in the United States last week, so if she can do it, you can too. It’s just that easy. No excuses, no lines, just go and vote.

 

And that’s a wrap, so go out there, campaign for your favorite candidate or cause and then go and vote. This is Jeremy Griffith from the American Millennium Online. Have a great day.

Jeff Johnson for Governor Ad:

Jim Hagedorn for Congress Ad:

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McFadden Closes on Liberal Opponent Franken

Mike McFadden, Republican challenger running against Sen. Al Franken, addresses Rochester voters in regard to health care Friday. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

Mike McFadden, Republican challenger running against Sen. Al Franken, addresses Rochester voters in regard to health care Friday. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

by Jeremy Griffith
The American Millennium Online

 

Mike McFadden, the Republican competitor with liberal Senator Al Franken of Minnesota is attempting to close the gap with his opponent even as he tries to differentiate himself from Franken’s record.

The challenger debated Franken last week in Duluth. This week McFadden met with Rochester residents on his plan for fixing health care.

He says, “Obamacare, or MNSure in Minnesota, is a train-wreck, and that train keeps wrecking!” Mcfadden went on to explain that the Affordable Health Care Act, or Obamacare as it is most commonly known, is based on three prominent lies told to the American People by the President. He says, the cost of health care was supposed to go down, it’s actually gone up quite a bit. Obama said it would increase access; in fact fewer people have access now than did before, as people are forced off their employer provided health care due to the outrageous cost to small business.

“147,000 Minnesotans found out that wasn’t true,” McFadden said.

And finally, McFadden explained that the quality of health care would go down, not increase as the president promised. “Whenever government gets involved in health care, you get a decrease in quality, like what is happening with the VA,” McFadden said. “I won’t let that happen if I’m elected as the Senator from the great state of Minnesota!”

McFadden met with a small but enthusiastic crowd in Rochester on Friday. He told the crowd he was pleased to get the endorsement of two prominent northern Minnesota newspapers including Duluth. A most recent poll cited by McFadden has him closing within two points of Franken, which is within the margin of error.

ABC’S Eyewitness 5 notes on their website that Franken was down in 2008 when he challenged Republican Norm Coleman and went on to win that election, after a legal challenge and a vote recount, with a slim margin of 312 votes. So, Franken, while still in the lead, maybe vulnerable. According to the latest polling we’ve seen, the closest McFadden has been able to close is eight points. You can see the latest polling day from Real Clear Politics here. See McFadden’s full comments in the video below.

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Rose’s Journey: A Path to Citizenship

Roselle with Sen. Carla Nelson-R, with me the author, on Rose's swearing in day.

Roselle with Sen. Carla Nelson-R, with me the author, on Rose’s swearing in day.

by Jeremy Griffith
The American Millennium Online

With hope for a better future, with aspirations and dreams, 848 new naturalized American Citizens were sworn in at a public ceremony at the Minneapolis Convention Center Sept. 24th.

The hall at the Minneapolis Convention Center was packed with people taking their oath of citizenship. 848 new citizens naturalized that day. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

The hall at the Minneapolis Convention Center was packed with people taking their oath of citizenship. 848 new citizens naturalized that day. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

I was a part of this journey since my girlfriend, the love of my life, embarked on it earlier this year. We decided together she’d been here long enough, now was the time to pursue becoming a citizen. We paid the money, $680 for the interview, biometric and other fees, with the help of family and friends. We borrowed a book to study for the test. We read all of the rules and did all the confusing paperwork. We called in to work in order to make the trips to Minneapolis and St. Paul for her appointments, we never missed one, and we were grateful for the people who helped us out and picked up or shifts.

We studied hard and in all, my baby’s interview took 9 minutes, 44 seconds, just enough to answer six questions of the battery of the 100 we studied, time enough to drop all her paper work on the floor and raise the wrong hand. Nervous as we were, she knew all the questions by heart and answered them succinctly enough to impress the interviewer. We did it, we were on our way to becoming a citizen. I was so proud of her.

Roselle with Sen. Amy Klobuchar-D, left and State Sen. Carla Nelson-R, right. It doesn't matter the party, politicians love new voters. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

Roselle with Sen. Amy Klobuchar-D, left and State Sen. Carla Nelson-R, right. It doesn’t matter the party, politicians love new voters. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

My girl, Roselle Salvador Taburada, the Asian lady with the Spanish name, came here to America over seven years ago from the Philippines. She spoke English and had a degree in business management. He got her Green Card and got a job as soon as she was able. It wasn’t always easy. Her husband was a dud and her marriage failed. In her anger and despair she contemplated leaving and going back to the Philippines. But she stuck with it and got a better job, in food service. She was active with friends and with the community, earning a black belt in Tae Kwon Do and competing in tournaments. We’ve got her trophies on our bookcase in our home. She’s been active in the Philippine-American community. Her life was turning around and it seemed time to strive for the ultimate goal, citizenship.

On that happy day we were so excited. She wore a new pink dress that she picked out for the occasion. We left home early so as not to get lost in traffic and be late. It was cold and rainy and there was fog on the road. I just love driving in traffic on days like that. We found our spot and stood in line. There was a spot marked out for the new citizens there in the hall of the convention center. We got there early and had to wait. There were so many people there that we filled the hall. It was standing room only when we finally got in. About half an hour late, thanks to government inefficiencies, the doors of the hall opened and we started to get sorted. I couldn’t sit with my Rose, we were put in separate lines and ended up on opposite sides of the hall. I brought the wrong camera for the occasion, I thought I would be closer to the stage, and got photos I’m not real happy with. But we made it through and it was a nice ceremony.

The League of Women voters used up the waiting time before the ceremony and offered to register all the new voters. I commented about this to the two Mexican women sitting next to me, saying, “Look, it’s so nice of the League of Women voters to register new Democrats, uh, I mean ‘voters’!” They laughed politely. Both of the ladies, fast friends who had never met before that day, were amazing and fun to talk with. The younger one was from Peru and was there for a friend. She fiddled with her new Android Galaxy smart phone that looked more like a television. (I bet she got better photos than me.) The other woman had come from Mexico and had been here for over 20 years. I enjoyed listening to them speaking Spanish together, the syllables sound like music to me, unlike the German and Arabic I studied. It was fun talking and listening to their stories of their separate journeys to become citizens and their hopes for their relatives and friends who were being sworn in that day.

It's gotta be official. US District Court Judge for the State of Minnesota calls the court to order and swears in the new naturalized citizens. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

It’s gotta be official. US District Court Judge for the State of Minnesota calls the court to order and swears in the new naturalized citizens. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

The League finished passing out pens and papers to the attendants and the ceremony got underway. The US District Court for the state of Minnesota was the host of the event and opened the ceremony as t hey would any other official court function. An assistant to a US district court judge opened the court session. She took the time to announce the numbers of people present from the different countries and had each stand in turn when they were announced. That’s when we learned the nationalities and the numbers of each applicant present. I remember a few; two from Iran, two from Iraq, 20 from the Philippines, one each from Canada, Israel, Australia and the UK. Many from war torn, disease-ridden Africa, including the largest number from the non-country of East Africa, Somalia: 98! Wow!

When the district court judge’s assistant completed the task of announcing all the applicants, she made a motion to open the court and recommended that the gathered applicants be sworn in as citizens, having been vetted as people of high moral character who have completed all of the requirements of citizenship. The judge took over and presided over the court, approving the recommendation of citizenship for all in attendance. There was a music video played with the patriotic Lee Greenwood song played. The judge had all the attendees stand and raise their right hand as the oath was administered. The oath, very similar to the oath I took as a newly commissioned lieutenant in the United States Army, was displayed on a large view screen at the front of the hall. The applicants spoke in unison, swearing allegiance to the United States, abandoning all allegiance to their country of origin and swearing to protect their newly adopted nation with force of arms if need be. It was a very moving ceremony. I cried.

A happy new citizen gets her photo taken with my parents, Kathy and Len. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

A happy new citizen gets her photo taken with my parents, Kathy and Len. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

I made the hail-Mary move of inviting our local state senator to join us for the ceremony and to the pleasure and surprise of both of us, she was happy to come. Carla Nelson-R from Rochester, found my parents in the large hall and sat with them for the ceremony. The judge recognized her as well as our Federal Senator, Amy Klobuchar, who sat up front with the judge and his assistant. We were happy to meet both of our representatives, state and federal on that important day.

At the conclusion of the ceremony, Klobuchar made a few remarks. She talked about citizenship, and about her own path through life. She explained that her grandfather had been a coal miner in northern Minnesota, had taken care of his family and worked hard in the mine all his life, putting the children through school. Now a generation later, his grand-daughter was a United States Senator. It is that kind of determination and hard work that makes a US citizen and affords the citizen success later on, success they might not otherwise find in their country of origin.

I have no major qualms about what our Senator said up until that point. I was actually quite impressed with the history of or democratic senator, a story I had not heard before. Then she told the crowd in what sounded like a campaign speech, that she was for comprehensive immigration reform, to which the majority of the crowd loudly applauded. Except for me and the Peruvian and Mexican sitting next to me.

Comprehensive immigration reform, Senator?! What does that mean? We have a legal process that allows many, many people to enter the country legally every year, many who take the step to become legal citizens. On that day, 98 Africans who had escaped the black hole of that continent, Somalia, were sworn in and naturalized. What more do you want? Should we swing the doors open to everyone who wants to come? Should we invite even those people who don’t embrace our values? I think we ought to keep and embrace our current system or more clearly define how you propose to change it. I didn’t hear the Senator do that.

At the end of the ceremony, my parents and Sen. Nelson found us. I still hadn’t seen Rose, who was still up front getting her certificate of citizenship. I told the Senator, doubtful, “I don’t think we can get up there.” She said, “Don’t worry, let me take care of that.” She lead me through the crowd to the front where we found Rose. We then pushed to the head of the line to meet Sen. Klobuchar. Nelson introduced herself to the senator’s staffer, who waived us ahead. Because of Nelson’s clout, we got our photo taken with our Federal senator, a moment in time we will never forget. The Federal judge we missed, he had already escaped out the back.

Sen. Carla Nelson made the effort to make our day special. She used her cloud and introduced us to our federal rep, Sen. Amy Klobuchar. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

Sen. Carla Nelson made the effort to make our day special. She used her clout and introduced us to our federal rep, Sen. Amy Klobuchar. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

Since the ceremony, we’ve gotten a lot of recognition for Rose on her achievement. We’ve registered to vote and we are studying the candidates. I hope the other new citizens sworn in that day are also happy with their achievements but also studying the issues that are affecting our state and our nation. I hope they will uphold their oath to protect and defend their new nation, abandoning interests in other lands. I hope. If they have the work ethic, patriotism and drive of the Pilipino immigrants I’ve met in the last two years, they’ll do fine.

Rose and I are very grateful for all the support we received from family and friends.

A new citizen relaxes after the dust settles. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

A new citizen relaxes after the dust settles. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

Rose always gets people coming up to her saying, “Congratulations dear, now you can pay taxes like the rest of us!” to which Rose replies, “You’re crazy, I already paid the taxes!” Do you think the IRS would let us by without paying taxes, you are crazy.

I’ve put off writing this column because I didn’t know quite what to say. I guess the major thing I want people to know is what it took for us to get here and our gratitude for all who helped and supported us. That’s all. And for all who want to come here and enjoy the benefits of citizenship I want to say this, please don’t violate our laws to do it. Do the right thing, the legal thing. The benefits of citizenship are massive, but so are the responsibilities. Both go hand in hand. Don’t take on this journey if you are not able to accept one without the other. There is a path and many have taken it and have been grateful for it. You can do it too, if you want to become a citizen of the United States of America.

Rose and I are very grateful for everyone who made this day possible. -Jeremy Griffith, The American Millennium

Rose and I are very grateful for everyone who made this day possible. -Jeremy Griffith, The American Millennium

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Johnson Wins First Gubernatorial Debate in Rochester

by Jeremy Griffith
American Millennium Online

 

Commissioner Jeff Johnson gives a strong performance at the first gubernatorial debate in Rochester Mn. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

Commissioner Jeff Johnson gives a strong performance at the first gubernatorial debate in Rochester Mn. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

The headline above is a bit of a conceit I admit, from a Conservative Republican blogger such as myself, but in my view, Commissioner Jeff Johnson, Republican candidate for governor of Minnesota clearly lead the  debate against is opponents: Incumbent Democratic Governor Mark Dayton and Independent candidate Hannah Nicollet.

 

The debate occurred Wednesday at Mayo Civic Center in Rochester and was televised on public television.

 

Johnson was on point from the beginning, he attacked the governor in a way that didn’t make him look like a jerk, he was respectful to his opponents and he was armed with facts.

 

Governor Mark Dayton had strong support in Rochester and didn't make any major gaffes at the first debate in Rochester MN. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

Governor Mark Dayton had strong support in Rochester and didn’t make any major gaffes at the first debate in Rochester MN. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

Having said that, Dayton was better prepared and performed better than I thought he would, even though he always has that befuddled look on his face when I see him in public and he mumbled a bit. The governor was quick to respond to his critic and didn’t make any major gaffes.

 

Former software designer Hannah Nicollet, the Independent candidate, surprised me a little, was engaging in the debate and even though her answers were long and meandering, still made some good points which her opponents, Dayton and Johnson were forced to agree with. I sat next to a member of her campaign staff and let him know how impressed I was, even though it was apparent it was her first debate.

 

Hannah Nicollet, the Independent candidate for Governor, gave a good performance at the first debate. She should consider running for lower office to get more experience. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

Hannah Nicollet, the Independent candidate for Governor, gave a good performance at the first debate. She should consider running for lower office to get more experience. -photo by Jeremy Griffith

The staffer agreed. “She needs to slow down a bit and give the answers we know she has,” the staffer said.

 

Now I don’t think Nicollet has a chance in this field, but I could be wrong. Minnesota has voted for independents before. However, the last independent governor, Jesse Ventura, was a celebrity with name recognition with an aggressive competent staff. At the time the state was pissed off with both the democrats and republicans in that race, which was extremely helpful for Ventura. Nicollet has none of those aspects in her favor and she should consider running for a lower office such as state rep or senator, or as a small town Mayor. That would give her more credibility if she were to run for higher office in the future.

 

That being said, she added to the debate and should be allowed to compete in all five gubernatorial debates, which is what the governor agreed. It helps him as in most cases the independent party candidate, with the exception of Ventura, bleeds away support for the Republican candidate.

 

I’m happy to have seen this first debate in person, and I look forward to seeing the televised debates coming later in the month. Dayton, while he has a lot of local support, is vulnerable in several areas, such as health care, transportation such as roads and bridges, and his seeming abandonment of greater Minnesota areas. Incidentally, Johnson made a point to attack the governor, very successfully I might add, in all of those areas.

 

Johnson has an uphill climb against a heavily entrenched liberal base here in the state. He’ll have to keep on the offensive in public debates and in his TV and radio advertisement if he is to get traction against the incumbent. And, hopefully, the independents won’t bleed off so much support from Johnson that it throws the election to the other guy.

 

Johnson needs to have the help of his running mate, former state legislator Bill Kuisle, who has a lot of credibility in the greater Minnesota area and has been a popular public figure in the Rochester area.

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